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Firewall Chip Gets Funding

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EU funding of 2 million Euros has been announced for a major new three-year project to develop a re-configurable photonic 'firewall on a chip'. Called WISDOM, (WIrespeed Security Domains Using Optical Monitoring), the new system will plug a major gap in the global data network security armoury - the lack of tools to implement security checks and algorithms directly at high optical data communications rates.

Super Firewall Aims to Stop DDOS

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Computer researchers in Europe are developing a new prototype architecture for halting distributed denial-of-service (DDOS) attacks, where a barrage of traffic is directed at a Web site or server to shut it down.The Diadem Firewall deploys both hardware and software on the edge of a provider's network rather than within, said Georg Carle, chair of the computing and Internet department at the University of T

iptables: The Linux Firewall Administration Program

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"Packet-Filtering Concepts," covers the background ideas and concepts behind a packet-filtering firewall. Each built-in rule chain has its own default policy. Each rule can apply not only to an individual chain, but also to a specific network interface, message protocol type (such as TCP, UDP, or ICMP), and service port or ICMP message type number. Individual acceptance, denial, and rejection rules are defined for the INPUT chain and the OUTPUT chain, as well as for the FORWARD chain, which you'll learn about at the end of this chapter and in Chapter 6, "Packet Forwarding." The next chapter pulls those ideas together to demonstrate how to build a simple, single-system, custom-designed firewall for your site.

Installing a firewall on Ubuntu

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Ubuntu's desktop install provides a bunch of useful software for desktop users, but it doesn't install a firewall by default. Luckily, it's really simple to get a firewall up and running on Ubuntu. Frankly, I'm glad that the default install doesn't set up a firewall. Most of my computers live behind a firewall at all times anyway, and I've always been annoyed by installers that demand I deal with firewall questions when I've already got the situation well in hand. If I want a firewall on a machine, I can set one up on my own. Since Ubuntu is, in part, aimed at corporate desktops, a firewall is unnecessary for many installations.

Standards In Desktop Firewall Policies

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The idea of a common desktop firewall policy in any size organization is a very good thing. It makes responses to external or internal situations such as virus outbreaks or network-oriented propagation of viruses more predictable. In addition to providing a level of protection against port scanning, attacks or software vulnerabilities, it can provide the organizations local security team a baseline or starting point in dealing with such events. The purpose of this article is to discuss the need for a desktop firewall policy within an organization, determine how it should be formed, and provide an example of one along with the security benefits it provides an organization.

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