Password Cracking Wordlists and Tools for Brute Forcing

    Date14 Feb 2008
    20436
    Posted ByBrittany Day
    "Know your enemy." So the saying goes in all forms of the attacker/defender relationship. This article is an example of that. One of the most vulnerable forms of security is the password - many people have easy to duplicate passwords, companies often keep default passwords the same, and so on and so forth. Crackers can take advantage of this - especially if they have the right tools. And the better you know those tools, the better you can protect against them. Do note there are also various tools to generate wordlists for brute forcing based on information gathered such as documents and web pages (such as Wyd - password profiling tool) These are useful resources that can add unique words that you might not have if your generic lists.
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