Thank you for reading the LinuxSecurity.com weekly security newsletter. The purpose of this document is to provide our readers with a quick summary of each week's most relevant Linux security headlines.

LinuxSecurity.com Feature Extras:

Peter Smith Releases Linux Network Security Online - Thanks so much to Peter Smith for announcing on linuxsecurity.com the release of his Linux Network Security book available free online. "In 2005 I wrote a book on Linux security. 8 years later and the publisher has gone out of business. Now that I'm free from restrictions on reproducing material from the book, I have decided to make the entire book available online."

Securing a Linux Web Server - With the significant prevalence of Linux web servers globally, security is often touted as a strength of the platform for such a purpose. However, a Linux based web server is only as secure as its configuration and very often many are quite vulnerable to compromise. While specific configurations vary wildly due to environments or specific use, there are various general steps that can be taken to insure basic security considerations are in place.


  With This Tiny Box, You Can Anonymize Everything You Do Online (Oct 13)
 

No tool in existence protects your anonymity on the Web better than the software Tor, which encrypts Internet traffic and bounces it through random computers around the world. But for guarding anything other than Web browsing, Tor has required a mixture of finicky technical setup and software tweaks.

  (Oct 15)
 

Another security vulnerability is hitting the tech (and mainstream!) press, and we want to make Fedora users get straight, simple information. This one is CVE-2014-3466, and the cute nickname of the day is "POODLE".

  (Oct 14)
 

Many security experts feel that passwords are no longer sufficient to keep online accounts safe from hackers, but we're still a long way from widespread adoption of biometrics and alternative methods of authentication.

  Laura Poitras on the Crypto Tools That Made Her Snowden Film Possible (Oct 15)
 

As a journalist, Laura Poitras was the quiet mastermind behind the publication of Edward Snowden's unprecedented NSA leak. As a filmmaker, her new movie Citizenfour makes clear she's one of the most important directors working in documentary today. And when it comes to security technology, she's a serious geek.

  These Are The Emails Snowden Sent to First Introduce His Epic NSA Leaks (Oct 13)
 

Six months before the world knew the National Security Agency's most prolific leaker of secrets as Edward Joseph Snowden, Laura Poitras knew him as Citizenfour. For months, Poitras communicated with an unknown "senior government employee" under that pseudonym via encrypted emails, as he prepared her to receive an unprecedented leak of classified documents that he would ask her to expose to the world.

  Introducing the USB armory project (Oct 14)
 

Thanks to Andrea Barisani for sending this in. The USB armory from Inverse Path is an open source hardware design, implementing a flash drive sized computer.The compact USB powered device provides a platform for developing and running a variety of applications.

  Leaked Snapchat videos and pictures posted online (Oct 13)
 

Thousands of Snapchat videos and images have been posted online over the weekend, some after apparently leaking from a third-party website where they had been stored.

  CAINE Linux Distribution Helps Investigators With Forensic Analysis (Oct 17)
 

There is no shortage of Linux distributions to serve specific markets and use cases. In the security market, a number of Linux distributions are widely used, including Kali Linux, which is popular with security penetration testers. There's also CAINE Linux, which is focused on another area of security. CAINE, an acronym for Computer Aided INvestigative Environment, is a Linux distribution for forensic investigators.

  (Oct 17)
 

Making no pretense of balance or objectivity, Vivien Lesnik Weisman's excitable documentary "The Hacker Wars" is a forceful indictment of the United States government's surveillance and prosecution of computer hackers and journalists.

  (Oct 17)
 

Hackers are big news! On October 2, a New York Times headline trumpeted: "JP Morgan Chase Hacking Affects 76 Million Households." Recently retailers like Home Depot and Target were hit as well -- data banks reportedly hacked, personal information potentially compromised.

  Dreaded SSLv3 bug no monster, only a POODLE (Oct 15)
 

On Tuesday, Google's Bodo M