SuSE: 'scotty' buffer overflow

    Date02 Jul 2001
    CategorySuSE
    2932
    Posted ByLinuxSecurity Advisories
    Ntping, a ping/traceroute program, is part of the Scotty package. It's failure is to read a hostname as commandline option without checking the size. This leads to a bufferoverrun, that could be used to gain root privileges
    
    ______________________________________________________________________________
    
                            SuSE Security Announcement
    
            Package:                scotty
            Announcement-ID:        SuSE-SA:2001:023
            Date:                   Monday, Jul 2nd 2001 15:30 MEST
            Affected SuSE versions: (6.0, 6.1, 6.2,) 6.3, 6.4, 7.0, 7.1, 7.2
            Vulnerability Type:     local privilege escalation
            Severity (1-10):        5
            SuSE default package:   no
            Other affected systems: yes
    
            Content of this advisory:
            1) security vulnerability resolved: scotty/ntping
               problem description, discussion, solution and upgrade information
            2) pending vulnerabilities, solutions, workarounds
            3) standard appendix (further information)
    
    ______________________________________________________________________________
    
    1)  problem description, brief discussion, solution, upgrade information
    
        Tkined's Scotty is a Tcl extension to build network management
        applications.
        Ntping, a ping/traceroute program, is part of the Scotty package.
        It's failure is to read a hostname as commandline option without checking
        the size.
        This leads to a bufferoverrun, that could be used to gain root privileges,
        because ntping is installed setuid root and is executeable by everyone.
    
        As a temporary workaround you could remove the setuid bit:
          /bin/chmod u-s /usr/bin/ntping
        or just allow trusted users the access the binary:
          /bin/chown root.trusted /usr/bin/ntping
          /bin/chmod 4750 /usr/bin/ntping
        Also add these permission changes to /etc/permissions.local.
    
    
        i386 Intel Platform:
    
        SuSE-7.0
         ftp://ftp.suse.com/pub/suse/i386/update/7.0/tcl2/scotty-2.1.10-315.i386.rpm
          ba862494c240b607b156612bcfcd99da
        source rpm:
         ftp://ftp.suse.com/pub/suse/i386/update/7.0/zq1/scotty-2.1.10-315.src.rpm
          a06e490783eaabfe1db79ff03028153c
    
        SuSE-6.4
         ftp://ftp.suse.com/pub/suse/i386/update/6.4/tcl2/scotty-2.1.10-314.i386.rpm
          b303c3b6f6b53bbfb05804387f6abafa
        source rpm:
         ftp://ftp.suse.com/pub/suse/i386/update/6.4/zq1/scotty-2.1.10-314.src.rpm
          1714012d8b68ca8191d5ccec67992e9e
    
        SuSE-6.3
         ftp://ftp.suse.com/pub/suse/i386/update/6.3/tcl2/scotty-2.1.10-314.i386.rpm
          2506a6ceefdfc547869417df190e6257
        source rpm:
         ftp://ftp.suse.com/pub/suse/i386/update/6.3/zq1/scotty-2.1.10-314.src.rpm
          9196abccc0b17ed26844cf3300d3cc60
    
    
        Sparc Platform:
    
        SuSE-7.0
         ftp://ftp.suse.com/pub/suse/sparc/update/7.0/tcl2/scotty-2.1.10-268.sparc.rpm
          98db75ae951400f6486150c041a97c95
        source rpm:
         ftp://ftp.suse.com/pub/suse/sparc/update/7.0/zq1/scotty-2.1.10-268.src.rpm
          b8bb4e526b79d5e6173b160f9ceb10e9
    
    
        AXP Alpha Platform:
    
        SuSE-7.0
         ftp://ftp.suse.com/pub/suse/axp/update/7.0/tcl2/scotty-2.1.10-273.alpha.rpm
          4e688975e393d3d42f2898cc17869b92
        source rpm:
         ftp://ftp.suse.com/pub/suse/axp/update/7.0/zq1/scotty-2.1.10-273.src.rpm
          6bd09c52c30d7ac92057bf5d28786c9d
    
        SuSE-6.4
         ftp://ftp.suse.com/pub/suse/axp/update/6.4/tcl2/scotty-2.1.10-272.alpha.rpm
          7014099ef97cef800fe2669dc410030b
        source rpm:
         ftp://ftp.suse.com/pub/suse/axp/update/6.4/zq1/scotty-2.1.10-272.src.rpm
          018cf855b56b6fc9de9be496744590cd
    
        SuSE-6.3
         ftp://ftp.suse.com/pub/suse/axp/update/6.3/tcl2/scotty-2.1.10-274.alpha.rpm
          6002583f730762da88884c2754c9a68b
        source rpm:
         ftp://ftp.suse.com/pub/suse/axp/update/6.3/zq1/scotty-2.1.10-274.src.rpm
          7257c5fcad741201da69f2551569ab22
    
    
        PPC PowerPC Platform:
    
        SuSE-7.0
         ftp://ftp.suse.com/pub/suse/ppc/update/7.0/tcl2/scotty-2.1.10-274.ppc.rpm
          40a150f560053e4a90e8fc36e4fb9190
        source rpm:
         ftp://ftp.suse.com/pub/suse/ppc/update/7.0/zq1/scotty-2.1.10-274.src.rpm
          b6dea15ed3e2f9a1d4032e4723afee55
    
    
        source rpm:
         ftp://ftp.suse.com/pub/suse/ppc/update/6.4/zq1/scotty-2.1.10-274.src.rpm
          75755249a092c61626b12f3b9cda35ea
    
    
    ______________________________________________________________________________
    
    2)  Pending vulnerabilities in SuSE Distributions and Workarounds:
    
      - dqs
        This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
    	 has found an exploitable buffer overflow bug in
        the dsh program from the dqs package on SuSE Linux distributions.
        To workaround the problem, do "chmod -s /usr/bin/dsh" and change the
        files /etc/permissions* to reflect the change. If you do not need the
        dqs package, then deinstall it (rpm -e dqs).
        Packages for most of the supported SuSE Linux distributions are
        available at the usual location  ftp://ftp.suse.com/pub/suse//
        for download and installation/update. Do not forget to change the files
        /etc/permissions* to remove the suid-bit from the dsh program. Please
        note that we will not issue a dedicated security announcement for this
        specific bug.
    
    
      - pcp
        Paul Starzetz discovered a security weakness in the setuid root program
        /usr/share/pcp/bin/pmpost. The common library in pcp trusts the
        environment that has been supplied by the user, regardless of privileged
        execution or not. By consequence, a user can specify the configuration
        file and therefore write to files owned by root. The problem is not based
        on insecurely following symlinks as stated by Paul Starzetz.
        The pcp package is not installed by default in SuSE Linux distributions.
        We have provided update packages for the SuSE Linux distributions version
        7.1 and 7.2 that remove the setuid bit from the pmpost binary. Versions
        before SuSE-7.1 were not affected because the setuid bit was not set.
        We thank Keith Owens and Mark Goodwin from Silicon Graphics for responding
        quickly and for publishing a new version of the pcp package which will
        be included in future releases of the SuSE Linux distribution. For more
        information see the /usr/share/doc/packages/pcp directory of your SuSE
        Linux installation after installing the update package, or go to
        obtained from  http://oss.sgi.com/projects/pcp/download .
        Please note that there will not be a dedicated security announcement
        for this specific bug.
    
    
      - fetchmail (fetchml)
        New fetchmail packages are available on the ftp server. The packages
        cure a buffer overflow that can be exploited by sending a victim a
        specially designed email, waiting for the victim's fetchmail program
        to pick up the email. We are preparing a security announcement for this
        problem.
    
    
      - openssh
        update packages for the openssh package after (and including) SuSE-6.4
        are available on our ftp servers ftp.suse.de (for < 7.1) or
        ftp.suse.com (for >= 7.1). We are currently checking for a non-security
        related irregularity in sshd's behaviour under faulty setup conditions.
    
    
      - exim
        SuSE Linux distributions do not contain the exim Mail Transport Agent
        (See  http://www.exim.org/ for details) and are therefore not susceptible
        to the recently found security-related bugs.
    
    
      - webmin
        SuSE Linux distributions do not contain the webmin administration
        web frontend (See  http://www.webmin.org/ for details) and are therefore
        not vulnerable to the recently found security-related problems in the
        software.
    
    
    ______________________________________________________________________________
    
    3)  standard appendix: authenticity verification, additional information
    
      - Package authenticity verification:
    
        SuSE update packages are available on many mirror ftp servers all over
        the world. While this service is being considered valuable and important
        to the free and open source software community, many users wish to be
        sure about the origin of the package and its content before installing
        the package. There are two verification methods that can be used
        independently from each other to prove the authenticity of a downloaded
        file or rpm package:
        1) md5sums as provided in the (cryptographically signed) announcement.
        2) using the internal gpg signatures of the rpm package.
    
        1) execute the command
            md5sum 
           after you downloaded the file from a SuSE ftp server or its mirrors.
           Then, compare the resulting md5sum with the one that is listed in the
           announcement. Since the announcement containing the checksums is
           cryptographically signed (usually using the key This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.),
           the checksums show proof of the authenticity of the package.
           We disrecommend to subscribe to security lists which cause the
           email message containing the announcement to be modified so that
           the signature does not match after transport through the mailing
           list software.
           Downsides: You must be able to verify the authenticity of the
           announcement in the first place. If RPM packages are being rebuilt
           and a new version of a package is published on the ftp server, all
           md5 sums for the files are useless.
    
        2) rpm package signatures provide an easy way to verify the authenticity
           of an rpm package. Use the command
            rpm -v --checksig 
           to verify the signature of the package, where  is the
           filename of the rpm package that you have downloaded. Of course,
           package authenticity verification can only target an uninstalled rpm
           package file.
           Prerequisites:
            a) gpg is installed
            b) The package is signed using a certain key. The public part of this
               key must be installed by the gpg program in the directory
               ~/.gnupg/ under the user's home directory who performs the
               signature verification (usually root). You can import the key
               that is used by SuSE in rpm packages for SuSE Linux by saving
               this announcement to a file ("announcement.txt") and
               running the command (do "su -" to be root):
                gpg --batch; gpg < announcement.txt | gpg --import
               SuSE Linux distributions version 7.1 and thereafter install the
               key "This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it." upon installation or upgrade, provided that
               the package gpg is installed. The file containing the public key
               is placed at the toplevel directory of the first CD (pubring.gpg)
               and at  ftp://ftp.suse.com/pub/suse/pubring.gpg-build.suse.de .
    
    
      - SuSE runs two security mailing lists to which any interested party may
        subscribe:
    
        This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
            -   general/linux/SuSE security discussion.
                All SuSE security announcements are sent to this list.
                To subscribe, send an email to
                    <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>.
    
        This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
            -   SuSE's announce-only mailing list.
                Only SuSE's security annoucements are sent to this list.
                To subscribe, send an email to
                    <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>.
    
        For general information or the frequently asked questions (faq)
        send mail to:
            <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.> or
            <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.> respectively.
    
        ===================================================
        SuSE's security contact is <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>.
        The <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.> public key is listed below.
        ===================================================
    ______________________________________________________________________________
    
        The information in this advisory may be distributed or reproduced,
        provided that the advisory is not modified in any way. In particular,
        it is desired that the cleartext signature shows proof of the
        authenticity of the text.
        SuSE GmbH makes no warranties of any kind whatsoever with respect
        to the information contained in this security advisory.
    
    
    
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