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    Vulnerability in widely used 'strings' utility could spell trouble for malware analysts

    Date28 Oct 2014
    CategoryHacks/Cracks
    2705
    Posted ByDave Wreski
    One of the first things a malware analyst does when encountering a suspicious executable file is to extract the text strings found inside it, because they can provide immediate clues about its purpose. This operation has long been considered safe, but it can actually lead to a system compromise, a security researcher found. String extraction is typically done using a Linux command-line tool called strings that
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