How to secure my webserver

Find the HOWTO or step-by-step guide that you need right here.

 

Discover How To Secure My Webserver HOWTOs

On secure-shell security

data:image/svg+xml,%3Csvg%20xmlns=%22http://www.w3.org/2000/svg%22%20viewBox=%220%200%20100%20100%22%3E%3C/svg%3E

It is 2020, and we can say for sure, that ssh-server is still one of the most popular services on Linux systems. During various meetings, I was often asked: How to secure SSH?  Even though this question seems trivial, it is not. There are a lot of things to remember to accomplish well-designed service security.

Simple Cloud Hardening

data:image/svg+xml,%3Csvg%20xmlns=%22http://www.w3.org/2000/svg%22%20viewBox=%220%200%20100%20100%22%3E%3C/svg%3E

Want to learn how to apply a few basic hardening principles to secure your cloud environment? This article does a great job of simplifying the server-hardening process for Cloud infrastructure.

How to secure your Linux cloud server

data:image/svg+xml,%3Csvg%20xmlns=%22http://www.w3.org/2000/svg%22%20viewBox=%220%200%20100%20100%22%3E%3C/svg%3E

Looking for tips on how to secure your Linux cloud? Linux offers many options for hardening your system and preventing unauthorized access. Some best practices for making sure your Linux cloud remains secure include encrypting communications, monitoring login authentication, using SSH-keys instead of passwords, setting up a firewall, updating your system, frequently scanning for malware and implementing an intrusion detection system.

Linux Server Hardening Using Idempotency with Ansible: Part 3

data:image/svg+xml,%3Csvg%20xmlns=%22http://www.w3.org/2000/svg%22%20viewBox=%220%200%20100%20100%22%3E%3C/svg%3E

In the previous articles, we introduced idempotency as a way to approach your server’s security posture and looked at some specific Ansible examples, including the kernel, system accounts, and IPtables. In this final article of the series, we’ll look at a few more server-hardening examples and talk a little more about how the idempotency playbook might be used.

Getting started with OpenSSL: Cryptography basics

data:image/svg+xml,%3Csvg%20xmlns=%22http://www.w3.org/2000/svg%22%20viewBox=%220%200%20100%20100%22%3E%3C/svg%3E

This article is the first of two on cryptography basics using OpenSSL, a production-grade library and toolkit popular on Linux and other systems. (To install the most recent version of OpenSSL, see here.) OpenSSL utilities are available at the command line, and programs can call functions from the OpenSSL libraries. The sample program for this article is in C, the source language for the OpenSSL libraries.

Are Your Linux Servers Really Protected?

data:image/svg+xml,%3Csvg%20xmlns=%22http://www.w3.org/2000/svg%22%20viewBox=%220%200%20100%20100%22%3E%3C/svg%3E

When thinking about IT security, one area that may not readily come to mind is the physical security of an enterprise’s servers. It’s often thought that because the servers are behind lock and key and/or in a data center, and because the data is in continuous use, encrypting the server drives isn’t needed since the data is never at-rest.

News

Powered By

Footer Logo

Linux Security - Your source for Top Linux News, Advisories, HowTo's and Feature Release.

Powered By

Footer Logo