How to secure my webserver

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Simple Cloud Hardening

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Want to learn how to apply a few basic hardening principles to secure your cloud environment? This article does a great job of simplifying the server-hardening process for Cloud infrastructure.

How to secure your Linux cloud server

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Looking for tips on how to secure your Linux cloud? Linux offers many options for hardening your system and preventing unauthorized access. Some best practices for making sure your Linux cloud remains secure include encrypting communications, monitoring login authentication, using SSH-keys instead of passwords, setting up a firewall, updating your system, frequently scanning for malware and implementing an intrusion detection system.

Linux Server Hardening Using Idempotency with Ansible: Part 3

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In the previous articles, we introduced idempotency as a way to approach your server’s security posture and looked at some specific Ansible examples, including the kernel, system accounts, and IPtables. In this final article of the series, we’ll look at a few more server-hardening examples and talk a little more about how the idempotency playbook might be used.

Getting started with OpenSSL: Cryptography basics

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This article is the first of two on cryptography basics using OpenSSL, a production-grade library and toolkit popular on Linux and other systems. (To install the most recent version of OpenSSL, see here.) OpenSSL utilities are available at the command line, and programs can call functions from the OpenSSL libraries. The sample program for this article is in C, the source language for the OpenSSL libraries.

Are Your Linux Servers Really Protected?

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When thinking about IT security, one area that may not readily come to mind is the physical security of an enterprise’s servers. It’s often thought that because the servers are behind lock and key and/or in a data center, and because the data is in continuous use, encrypting the server drives isn’t needed since the data is never at-rest.

Protect Your Websites with Let's Encrypt

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Back in the bad old days, setting up basic HTTPS with a certificate authority cost as much as several hundred dollars per year, and the process was difficult and error-prone to set up. Now we have Let's Encrypt for free, and the whole thing takes just a few minutes.

Securing your VNC connection using SSH

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VNC stands for Virtual Network Computing. It is remote control software which allows you to view and fully interact with one computer desktop using a VNC viewer on another computer desktop anywhere on the LAN or Internet. There are many facets of ensuring your VNC is secure and this article shows you how to do it with a Linux (OpenSuse 10.3) server. This is a great step-by-step way to establish a quick secure way to access remote desktops with SSH.

HowTo: Prevent a Fork Bomb Attack

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Fork bombing attacks, like other dangers, can wreak havoc on a system if you aren't careful. Every angle that isn't covered could in fact be the most vulnerable resource to a potential cracker. Here you get a quick overview on what needs to be done to make the most of your protection: Limiting user processes is important for running a stable system. To limit user process just add user name or group or all users to /etc/security/limits.conf file and impose process limitations.

Enable Multiple HTTPS Sites For One IP Using TLS Extensions

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If you need to set up secure website connections, this HOWTO is what you need. IT's focused on Debian but will help no matter what distribution you may be using. This how-to is Debian specific but could be ported to other distributions since the concept is the same. In order to use TLS Extensions we have to patch and recompile apache2 and recompile OpenSSL with the enable-tlsext directive. If you are going to use this HOWTO, you may want to check out their "Perfect Debian" HOWTO as well.

Linux IPv6 HOWTO (en)

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Here, Peter Bieringer at The Linux Documentation Project goes over keeping remote access desktops secure with IPv6. Constantly updated, this is a great resource to keep in your bookmarks, as it is one of the most comprehensive HOWTO's you can find. Highly recommended for anyone looking to understand the in-depth world of IP.

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