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Firewall

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Linux Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) Ethernet Interface Requirements and Configuration

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(The)Demilitarized zone, used to secure an internal network from external access. You can use Linux firewall to create DMZ easily. There are many different ways to design a network with a DMZ. The basic method is to use a single Linux firewall with 3 Ethernet cards. The following simple example discusses DMZ setup and forwarding public traffic to internal servers. There's a little advanced know-how required here and he recommends a couple good firewalls to set up such functionality just in case this very useful guide doesn't fit the bill. If you are looking to set up a Linux Demilitarized zone a couple of options include EnGarde, IpCop and others.

Iptables as a Replacement for Commercial Enterprise Firewalls

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Are you administrating a corporate network? How do you ensure securing your web services? There are many different solutions, but Iptables is one of the newer ones, and is up to the job. With IT budgets getting tighter, managers need to trim costs. Service contracts are expensive for any technology; firewalls are no exception. Netfilter, the project that provides the packet filtering program Iptables, is a free firewall alternative. While it lacks the service contract of commercial solutions and a pretty interfaces to make firewall modification easy, it has solid performance, performs effectively at firewalling, and allows for add-on functionality to enhance its reporting and response functions.

Review: 7 Linux/BSD Firewalls

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A new blogger to the Linux Security space (he switched months ago), the owner of Fsckin w/linux took a trip to test Firewalls and Linux. From IPCop to Smoothwall to the 8MB Monowall, he compares and contrasts the value of each platform - but with a catch. The HP Vectratesting platform we are using today is an HP Vectra slimline PC. Considering the computer was FREE (as in beer) after a company upgraded their workstations, the specifications are nothing to scoff at. * Pentium III 500 MHz * 192MB of RAM * 1GB Transcend disk-on-chip IDE module * Dual 100Mbps NICs Very interesting...

Interview with the author of "Linux Firewalls"

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Michael Rash, the author behind "Linux Firewalls" chimes in about his background, his distro of choice, the current state of Linux security and much, much more. He covers many issues and provides a lot of insight into security and Linux: Question: What is the most interesting fact you've become aware of while researching for this book? Intrusion detection systems and firewalls commonly offer the ability to tear down TCP connections by forging a RST packets, but the specifics of how this is done varies quite a bit across different IDS and firewall implementations. The most interesting fact I stumbled across during my research concerns differences in the handling of the ACK control bit on RST packets. For example,

IPFire: Free firewall for your home or SOHO

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IPFire is a linux based firewall distribution with a lot of extras. The base for the stable version 1.4.9 was the IPCop that has been hardly modified. There were added: Asterisk PBX, Samba, MorningReconnect, LPR-NG and many other things. I've always been a fan of Shorewall and Firestarter - what have you used as a good base firewall setup? Any thoughts how this will match up in an enterprise server environment?

Firewalls? Firewalls?? We don't need no stinkin' Firewalls!!

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Firewalls are often framed as a one job tool. Furthermore, when looking to set up a secure network infrastructure, this Debian Admin says that sometimes they aren't aren't even needed! To the contrary, Firewalls can be engineered to serve a number of purposes such as fragment reassembly for instance (as the author at TuxMachines states) and are generally only as secure as they are configured to be. It seems that Firewalls are commonly misconceived of both being the given for network security (possibly not true) and not nearly enough on their own (the given among those who know security). (bonus points for those who know the movie being alluded to in the title)

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