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Why it's time to stop setting SELinux to Permissive or Disabled

Why it's time to stop setting SELinux to Permissive or Disabled

Too many admins disable SELinux or set it to Permissive on their data center systems, as opposed to spending the necessary time to make the projects they're working on work with SELinux. Jack Wallen warns that admins are playing with fire by shrugging off SELinux, leaving their OSes weakened and susceptible to attacks.

Given the kerfuffle that has been CentOS lately, and the number of inevitable forks that will rise out of the ashes, there will probably be a large percentage of admins migrating to, or finally deploying, a Linux distribution based on Red Hat Enterprise Linux in some form or fashion. It may be Rocky Linux or AlmaLinux. It may be that you stick with CentOS Stream, or even purchase a license for Red Hat Enterprise Linux. If you're a non-profit or another eligible organization, you might qualify for RHEL for Open Source Infrastructure.

No matter which route you take, you'll be using a solid Linux distribution with serious security systems in place. 

However... It's such a powerful word, "however." It stops all natural flow of the narrative to make you wonder just what comes next.

You wait, and you wait, and you wait.

Until the inevitable: SELinux.

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