Server Security - Page 6

We have thousands of posts on a wide variety of open source and security topics, conveniently organized for searching or just browsing.

Discover Server Security News

Practicing safe DNS with Google

data:image/svg+xml,%3Csvg%20xmlns=%22http://www.w3.org/2000/svg%22%20viewBox=%220%200%20100%20100%22%3E%3C/svg%3E

The Internet's a dangerous place for an innocent Web browser to be searching alone for the right Web page, so the Domain Name System Security Extensions (DNSSEC) was created to make searching safer. That's the good news. The bad news is that DNSSEC adoption has been lagging. Now, Google has announced that it's supporting DNSSEC in its Google Public DNS service.

HTTPS Everywhere 3.0 supports more sites

data:image/svg+xml,%3Csvg%20xmlns=%22http://www.w3.org/2000/svg%22%20viewBox=%220%200%20100%20100%22%3E%3C/svg%3E

The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) has released a new version of its HTTPS Everywhere browser extension for Firefox that now supports encryption on even more web sites. The US digital rights advocacy organisation says that version 3.0 of its Firefox add-on, which automatically redirects users to more secure HTTPS connections when accessing certain web pages, now supports an additional 1,500 sites, more than twice as many as previous stable releases.

The Hack That Kept Me Awake at Night

data:image/svg+xml,%3Csvg%20xmlns=%22http://www.w3.org/2000/svg%22%20viewBox=%220%200%20100%20100%22%3E%3C/svg%3E

If I've seemed a little bleary-eyed and inattentive this week you can blame Jim Fallows. Late on Tuesday night I read his post about gmail, which linked to Mat Honan's piece for Wired about the destruction of his (Honan's) digital life. I was then up most of the night implementing Jim's advice about improving my computer security. This is by no means the first warning Jim has issued.

Mac Security: A Myth?

data:image/svg+xml,%3Csvg%20xmlns=%22http://www.w3.org/2000/svg%22%20viewBox=%220%200%20100%20100%22%3E%3C/svg%3E

Apple is taking steps to address the Java vulnerabilities behind the Flashback Trojan outbreak. But Java isn't the only attack vector for OS X -- and Apple users can no longer cling to the belief that Macs are virtually immune to malware.

Why Not Use Port Knocking?

data:image/svg+xml,%3Csvg%20xmlns=%22http://www.w3.org/2000/svg%22%20viewBox=%220%200%20100%20100%22%3E%3C/svg%3E

The robots currently at work knocking around for your guessable password could easily be repurposed to guess your Unicode password currently known as your port knocking sequence, and quite likely have been already. Plus, we already have authpf(8) for network-level restrictions on access.

News

Powered By

Footer Logo

Linux Security - Your source for Top Linux News, Advisories, HowTo's and Feature Release.

Powered By

Footer Logo