Thank you for reading the LinuxSecurity.com weekly security newsletter. The purpose of this document is to provide our readers with a quick summary of each week's most relevant Linux security headlines.

LinuxSecurity.com Feature Extras:

Peter Smith Releases Linux Network Security Online - Thanks so much to Peter Smith for announcing on linuxsecurity.com the release of his Linux Network Security book available free online. "In 2005 I wrote a book on Linux security. 8 years later and the publisher has gone out of business. Now that I'm free from restrictions on reproducing material from the book, I have decided to make the entire book available online."

Securing a Linux Web Server - With the significant prevalence of Linux web servers globally, security is often touted as a strength of the platform for such a purpose. However, a Linux based web server is only as secure as its configuration and very often many are quite vulnerable to compromise. While specific configurations vary wildly due to environments or specific use, there are various general steps that can be taken to insure basic security considerations are in place.


  How to Sabotage Encryption Software (And Not Get Caught) (Mar 17)
 

In the field of cryptography, a secretly planted "backdoor" that allows eavesdropping on communications is usually a subject of paranoia and dread. But that doesn't mean cryptographers don't appreciate the art of skilled cyphersabotage.

  You need to apply the OpenSSL patches today, not tomorrow (Mar 19)
 

At first glance, you might not think that the latest set of OpenSSL security patches are that important. Sure, there's a dozen of them and two are serious, but are they really that bad? Yes, actually they're not just bad, they're awful.

  HTTPS Opens Door to Paid Pinterest Bug Bounty (Mar 18)
 

Pinterest's journey toward becoming a fully HTTPS website opened a lot of doors, including a potentially profitable one for hackers.

  The NSA Has Taken Over the Internet Backbone. We're Suing to Get it Back. (Mar 16)
 

Every time you email someone overseas, the NSA copies and searches your message. It makes no difference if you or the person you're communicating with has done anything wrong. If the NSA believes your message could contain information relating to the foreign affairs of the United States

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